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Much Abrew About Nothing: Slivers (Modern)


Hello, everyone! Welcome to the new and improved Much Abrew About Nothing. Last week, the most popular Instant Deck Tech—by far—was Slivers for Modern, so today we'll be playing some five-color tribal and seeing if the deck has what it takes to compete in the format! Also, we've been streaming some of the runners-up of Instant Deck Tech on twitch.tv/mtggoldfish. We just started releasing five–ten minute highlight videos for those without the patience to slog through a full three-hour league. You can check out the most recent one: Temur Traverse.

We'll have some notes on Slivers after the videos, but first a quick reminder. If you enjoy the Much Abrew About Nothing series and the other video content on MTGGoldfish, make sure to subscribe to the MTGGoldfish YouTube Channel to keep up on all the latest and greatest.

Slivers: Instant Deck Tech

Slivers vs. 8 Rack

Slivers vs. Jund

Slivers vs. Slivers

Slivers vs. Illusions

Slivers Wrap Up

Thoughts

  • First off, the deck was a lot more complicated than I thought heading into the matches. Obviously, getting the right mana at the right time is key and is sometimes challenging in a 20-land, five-color deck running four Mutavaults, but there are also some really interesting choices as far as sequencing. For example, do you play a Gemhide Sliver on Turn 2 into two 2-drops on Turn 3, or do you get the beats started with a Predatory Sliver on Turn 2? Slivers seems like the kind of deck that rewards a player for sticking with it for a long time and learning it inside and out, and I'm not very confident that I made all the right decisions during our matches. 
  • Collected Company and Aether Vial seem like the best cards in the deck, by a long shot. There were several games where we kept hands with multiple lords but not Aether Vial, and we were either too slow or ended up getting one-for-oned to death. Collected Company, on the other hand, is an insane amount of value when the creatures you hit are granting some benefit to the entire team.
  • The deck is extremely fun to play, especially for a tribal/aggro deck. There's a lot going on, and the deck seems to have a lot more play than a straightforward, linear aggro deck. 
  • The one problem I noticed is that we don't really have much interaction. For Slivers, it really does seem that the best defense is a good offense, but there were times I found myself wishing for a Path to Exile or Dismember
  • For me, the bottom line is that Slivers doesn't seem like the type of deck that you can just pick up and play optimally, so if you want to have success with the deck, plan on putting in a lot of reps, but once you put in the work, it seems to have a power level that can win a tournament. 

Conclusion

Anyway, that's all for today. Make sure to vote for next week's deck by liking, subscribing to, and commenting on Instant Deck Tech videos! As always, leave your thoughts, ideas, opinions, and suggestions in the comments, and you can reach me on Twitter @SaffronOlive, or at SaffronOlive@MTGGoldfish.com.


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