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Core Set 2021 Draft Guide


Hey I'm Ves, I know I'm likely an unfamiliar name to most everyone reading this, but maybe you've seen something I've written pop up somewhere about this game or another, and hopefully it's helped you. I've been grinding draft fairly hard in the last year or so, including a Top 20 Mythic finish in the previous Core Set, and I've been wildly successful so far in both Ikoria and Core 2021 draft, going infinite in both. So today I'm going to walk you through drafting Core Set 2021, and hopefully pick you up some extra wins.

Generally, when people think about drafting a Core Set they think about taking generically powerful cards that happen to be in the same colors, and using them to overpower their opponents over a long slog of a game. Thankfully in recent years, these sets have become more about drafting a deck instead of drafting cards. This set is no different, though there are some twists. While it does not generally reach the silly synergy levels of Ikoria, where you might have pointed a Zenith Flare at an opponent for double digits in the cycling deck, you can still do some neat stuff. Think more along the lines of Thieving Otter plus Dreamtail Heron, but better than that.

The first week of this format I've managed to play a ton of drafts to good success, and hopefully a bit of what I've learned can be transferred to you through this primer. This format is fairly aggressive, and that might be at odds with how some people are used to playing in limited. Not to say there isn't the ability to grind, but aggressive decks not only come together more often, they are extremely adept at punishing any stumbles from slower decks. This puts a higher emphasis on having good, highly impactful cards to play during the first three turns of the game and having fewer expensive cards unless they are extremely powerful. This is especially true because expensive creatures aren't exceptionally beefy in power and toughness at Common, and even Uncommon at times. You want to take two-drops early and often, and they are typically more important than expensive removal spells.

Currently I think that there are three standout archetypes, but one of them has three color variants itself. I also think there is one deck to mostly avoid—unless you like spinning your wheels for possibly no benefit. I'm mostly going to be focusing on these archetypes in terms of explaining how I currently see the format, and how I've been having success.

White Aggro

The White aggressive decks (UW Flyers, WR Go Wide,  WG Counters) share some similarities across the board, so we'll start with the White base. They tend to use basically any dorky white creatures, power them up with auras or cards that grant +1/+1 counters like Basri's Acolyte, Daybreak Charger, and Dub and possibly Uncommons like Basri's Solidarity, and then attack and use removal and combat tricks like Feat of Resistance to keep the ball rolling. Short Sword is also begrudgingly good here somehow. It's almost like a +1/+1 counter you can move around. The supplementary life gain from a small subset of their creatures allows these decks to race other aggressive decks comfortably as well.

The One-Drops

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These decks want to play multiple one-drops to facilitate curving out, and thankfully white has a great one at Common in Anointed Chorister. This card is sneaky good and provides a nice body for auras and +1/+1 counters early, and also acts as a mana sink late in games. A 4/4 lifelink is a very real threat, and it's likely it'll already be wearing a counter or aura at that point in the game if played early which can lead to some really nice turns when you'd normally just be lamenting you drew your 5th land instead of another spell. White's other one-drops in Staunch Shieldmate and Selfless Savior provide different roles. Shieldmate wears auras/counters decently but is a much worse creature by itself than Chorister is, and you generally want it less if you're already stocked on other one-drops. Selfless Savior is an Uncommon so you'll see it less, but it will typically push in a few points of damage if played on turn 1, but more importantly it provides a zero mana combat trick on board, and protects your other creatures which have received counters or auras from almost all removal, while simultaneously making combat a nightmare for your opponents.  

Basri's Acolyte is typically the glue that holds these deck together. Due to the highly compressed range of power and toughness in this set at lower CMCs it's generally able to allow two creatures to push through an attack when played on curve, with the Common situations being one getting through cleanly, and the other being able to trade with a higher CMC creature. The anthem like effect is strong itself, but plays up if you have one of the other effects that cares about +1/+1 counters specifically. Also importantly, a 2/3 lifelink body is itself a great target for counters and auras, while being useful for blocking aggressive early creatures. Acolyte is the best white Common in the set and you want to be taking it early and often, and it's a big reason why one-drops matter so much.  

Seasoned Hallowblade Feels Like a Two-Mana Planeswalker

White has some very powerful aggressive Uncommons in Seasoned HallowbladeSiege Striker, and each color pairs respective gold card is an aggressive two-drop that plays into the theme of that color. I'm going to point out Hallowblade specifically here which essentially lets you turn any card in hand into a zero-mana combat trick or counter target removal spell. It's the best low CMC card in the set to throw counters, auras or equipment on, and has a unique way of warping the game around it in a way that normally only happens with cards like Planeswalkers because it will generally be able to keep its power at or above the level of opposing blockers. When you start trading excess lands for spells your opponent has actually paid mana for, you generate a huge tempo advantage. At times Hallowblade will feel like your hand is full of 0 mana cards that make 3/1s, or 4/2's, or 5/3 first strikes, and that is just absurd. People were comparing it to Adanto Vanguard, but it's a much better blocker, and cards feel less costly than life in an aggressive format.

One of the great things about drafting this archetype is that there is flexibility during the drafting portion. You can be primarily in White in pack one with maybe a card or two of the other colors and then you can seamlessly transition to the secondary color in pack two depending on what you see. On top of that because white has so many good aggressive cards, and so good few defensive cards, your deck will feel mostly cohesive instead of scrambling to try to pick a lane. It actually devalues something like Swift Response here however. Before the set released people had it pegged as a top Common. While it's still a fine playable card, you're going to be the aggressor so often that your opponent will rarely have tapped creatures. I'm generally on board with playing one, but don't want more than that in the aggressive decks. You want your removal to be proactive so you can keep attacking, and you're better off taking good two-drops instead.  

White-Blue "Flyers?"

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The signpost Uncommon for Azorius in Watcher of the Spheres is super powerful providing both mana discounts for flyers and a 2-drop flyer that can punch through for 3 in the air if you've cast a flyer that turn. The problem? There is an extremely low density of flyers in this set at lower converted mana costs! Concordia Pegasus is the only other true 1–2CMC flyer in the UW color pairing, and even at 3CMC you're only picking up 3 additional flyers in Mistral Singer, Vryn Wingmare, and Skyscanner and none of them are that impressive in the color combo though Singer and Scanner can be solid. WU's signpost Uncommon essentially misleads you on what this color combination is about! It's a white-based beatdown deck that uses Gale Swooper, Keen Glidemaster, and Rousing Read to give creatures flying to close out games when the ground has gummed up. This makes cards with initially unimpressive P/T stats like Falconer Adept or Library Larcenist much more threatening as they are able to attack more often. This is supplemented by blue's ability to tap creatures with Frost Breath, or bounce them with Roaming Ghostlight or Unsubstantiate. Blue does something unique in regards to the white based aggressive decks as it also provides a lot of playable card draw and filtering in Rain of Revelation, Jeskai Elder, Rousing Read, etc. which allows the deck to not run out of gas but makes it easier to get to your powerful expensive cards more reliably and close out the game.

Top Commons

Basri's Acolyte [M21]
Roaming Ghostlight [M21]
Anointed Chorister [M21]
Rousing Read [M21]
Feat of Resistance [M21]

Top Uncommons

Seasoned Hallowblade [M21]
Faith's Fetters [M21]
Watcher of the Spheres [M21]
Siege Striker [M21]
Selfless Savior [M21]

Top Rares/Mythics

Sublime Epiphany [M21]
Baneslayer Angel [M21]
Basri's Lieutenant [M21]
Basri Ket [M21]
Ghostly Pilferer [M21]

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White-Red Go Wide

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A typical limited aggressive deck, there is a slight go wide theme, but very few token makers and they are at higher CMC. Alpine Houndmaster does a super Whisper Squad impression as the signpost Uncommon, grabbing two decent two-drops, while being a very good attacker itself. You're basically doing the baseline white aggro stuff I've already talked about, but you have access to a few additional quirks. Red has extremely efficient removal at the 1–3CMC slot with Shock, Scorching Dragonfire, and Soul Sear. They kill a huge amount of creatures at higher CMCs than their own cost so you're able to get a lot of tempo trading a low amount of mana for something your opponent typically paid 1–3 mana more for. Due to how much incentive players are given to tap out and play to the board in this format, and the general small size of creatures, Sure Strike also plays up as you're less likely to get blown out by an opposing trick, and 2 mana kill a creature is obviously amazing. Red has access to a wide variety of Common two-drops, but Chandra's Magmutt is the one you typically want. It's a fairly typical 2/2, but it can get an attack or two in then sit around pinging your opponent's face, which can get scary in board stalls. I'm currently pretty medium on the Common 5 drops in Turn to Slag and Pitchburn Devils  here vs. other Red archetypes. Lastly there is a dog tribal theme in RW. While both payoffs in Pack Leader and Animal Sanctuary are at rare, there are 6 dogs at Common and Uncommon, and the Houndmaster to play fetch so to speak. It is something to keep in mind with Pack Leader specifically because it is such a powerful card with just a few friends as you already want good attacking two-drops.

Top Commons

Scorching Dragonfire [M21]
Basri's Acolyte [M21]
Shock [M21]
Feat of Resistance [M21]
Chandra's Magmutt [M21]

Top Uncommons

Seasoned Hallowblade [M21]
Soul Sear [M21]
Heartfire Immolator [M21]
Faith's Fetters [M21]
Alpine Houndmaster [M21]

Top Rares/Mythics

Terror of the Peaks [M21]
Chandra, Heart of Fire [M21]
Baneslayer Angel [M21]
Subira, Tulzidi Caravanner [M21]
Pack Leader [M21]

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White-Green Counters

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White-Green's signpost Uncommon Conclave Mentor is bonkers. It essentially turns +1/+1 counters into +2/+2 counters, and I'd lean to taking it highly. Imagine casting Basri's Solidarity with it out and giving 3 or 4 creatures +2/+2 permanently (I have it feels GOOD) or Invigorating Surge + Mentor to put FIVE +1/+1 counters on a creature as early as turn 3. Remember how I was talking about how creatures were undersized a bit here in M21? Let's say hello to Drowsing Tyrannodon, the best Common two-drop in the set. It trades with or outsizes most four-drops, and even some five-drops, and remember it's a COMMON. Waking it up to be able to attack is easy as you'll have access to the counter effects from white and even more power pumping from Green like Pridemalkin, Setessan Training, and Hunter's Edge. Malkin even gives it trample, and a 4/4 trample on turn three attacking is terrifying. Green's other top Commons in Elvish Visionary and Track Down seem somewhat at odds with the counters theme, but they smooth out your draws a ton, and there is a slight drawing cards matter theme in green that your deck might touch on. Track Down is great to dig for you very powerful payoffs like Mentor or Basri's Acolyte, and they both help you potentially cast 2 spells a turn which can help with getting ahead on board. Lastly Ranger's Guile works great in conjunction with Feat of Resistance to protect your creatures that are full of counters. 

Top Commons

Basri's Acolyte [M21]
Drowsing Tyrannodon [M21]
Hunter's Edge [M21]
Anointed Chorister [M21]
Feat of Resistance [M21]

Top Uncommons

Conclave Mentor [M21]
Seasoned Hallowblade [M21]
Faith's Fetters [M21]
Selfless Savior [M21]
Basri's Solidarity [M21]

Top Rares/Mythics

Basri's Lieutenant [M21]
Elder Gargaroth [M21]
Baneslayer Angel [M21]
Scavenging Ooze [M21]
Basri Ket [M21]

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Blue-Red Spells

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This archetype is well supported due to the five prowess creatures at Common and Uncommon, and the pseudo prowess creatures in Spellgorger Weird and Riddleform. Blue and Red have strong Common cantrips available in Opt and Crash Through, which allow you to churn through your deck quickly for little mana investment, while also potentially giving ALL your prowess creatures +1/+1 and maybe even trample for a single mana. So much of the success of this deck comes down to how many cantrips you can get, and you should be taking them more highly than you currently are. Combining those cantrips with Thrill of Possibility and Kinetic Augur is one of the secretly powerful parts of the deck, as you'll be able to turn the excess lands you draw into spells. On top of this because you'll see so many cards in a game normally, the lower curving versions of this deck can sometimes play as low as 14-15 lands. The cheap and plentiful removal of red keeps the board clear while making your creatures better attackers, and Sure Strike might be more powerful here than it has ever been. The signpost card in Experimental Overload  asks you to do what you already want to do, play a ton of cheap spells. This is an effect for four mana you are generally happy to pay five for, and the fact that it triggers prowess on top of that is gravy. This is the one card in the set that can sometimes feel a bit Zenith Flare, where you get to the late game after one player really didn't seem to actually do much and suddenly they have a 10/10 that also drew them the best removal spell in their deck to recast. 

There are a few different ways this deck can typically be built. 

The first version of this deck skews faster and typically eschews having too many four-drops and five-drops, while playing a typical curve out game. If you're playing any expensive cards you typically want them to be Roaming Ghostlight or powerful rares like Sublime Epiphany

The second version of this deck is Goblin Wizardry combo. It looks to leverage the ability to put multiple prowess creatures into play at instant speed, untap then create big powerful attack steps with Burn Bright in conjunction with lower cost cards like Shock and Sure Strike. This version of the deck sometimes feels like it wins from out of nowhere as the combo with a single other spell is representing 10 damage. From my experience you generally want a single Burn Bright until you get to three or more copies of Wizardry, then at that point have one less copy of Burn Bright than Wizardy feels about right.

The third version of this deck is a slower version. It is generally one that didn't get there on having a great aggressive or combo plan. Typically you'll see a top end that has cards like Turn to Slag, Roaming Ghostlight, and Pitchburn Devils. The slower version of the deck has a few really good things going for it, one of which is that Enthralling Hold can play amazingly well when you're not the aggressor. It also typically has a higher land count and Vodalian Arcanist so it's better at playing expensive bombs. I would tend to not play Goblin Wizardry in this deck because the speed of it means it is much more likely the board is in such a state where the tokens cannot profitably attack.

One nice thing about drafting this deck is that if you start out drafting cheap Red removal you have the ability to flex into this deck or into White-Red. Black-Red is also a potentially strong deck you can get into, but I won't be covering it here though I think it might be a sleeper archetype.

Top Commons

Scorching Dragonfire [M21]
Spellgorger Weird [M21]
Goblin Wizardry [M21]
Crash Through [M21]
Opt [M21]

Top Uncommons

Soul Sear [M21]
Heartfire Immolator [M21]
Experimental Overload [M21]
Shipwreck Dowser [M21]
Riddleform [M21]

Top Rares/Mythics

Sublime Epiphany [M21]
Terror of the Peaks [M21]
Chandra, Heart of Fire [M21]
Volcanic Salvo [M21]
Stormwing Entity [M21]

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Teferi's Tutelage

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You might be thinking that is the name of a card and not a deck, but it is both. Tutelage is my pick for a top two Uncommon in the set, but because it attacks on such a unique axis it is a deck unto itself. Milling two cards every time you draw a card is certainly a powerful effect, and the fact that it comes with a draw on the card means you'll be able to get the party started immediately, while also digging for ways to protect both Tutelage and your life total. A previous version of this card in Psychic Corrosion didn't have a lot of believers, I think mostly because there was a much more powerful mill card available in Patient Rebuilding, but I was always a fan. Tutelage is a more powerful card itself, but it's also operating in a format with much better card draw than Divination

Before your Tutelage is in play, you need to protect yourself. The White based aggressive decks and the more explosive versions of the Blue-Red deck will crush you if you just try to mill about and not protect yourself. You won't have infinite removal spells either to deal with them. Once you have a tutelage your priority on creatures flips and you want creatures with high toughness for their CMC. You'll feel a little out there picking a Wall of Runes over a Mistral Singer but sometimes it's what you need to do. These decks want Tolarian Kraken, Vodalian Arcanist, Wall of Runes, and Wishcoin Crab. Wall of Runes is the sneaky standout here as a one-drop that can block most three-drops, while also blocking a few four-drops. The ability to scry for 1 also digs for Tutelage or card draw to close the game.

The Tutelage deck requires you to draft a lot of card draw to support it. Frantic InventoryOpt, Rain of RevelationRousing Read, Sanctum of Calm Waters, and Teferi's Protege become extremely important cards once you have a single Tutelage not only to trigger it, but to dig for it. Card draw that you can trigger multiple times has the highest value here because not only does it give inevitability, it provides additional distractions for your opponent. If they use a removal spell on a Teferi's Protege they aren't adding to the board or using that spell on a defensive creature. This can be supplemented by card draw in the other colors. Thankfully Green, Black, and Red also have some nice card draw spells. 

I want to specifically talk about Read the Tides for a moment. It's a card that hits both the protect yourself and card draw aspects. Bouncing two creatures can buy you an extremely long amount of time, and a lot of draw step mills, and sometimes the draw 3 is just game ending. I want one in every Tutelage deck.

Once your Tutelage is in play, protecting it becomes important. This is the one deck in the format where I'm very comfortable playing counterspells. Rewind and Cancel go up in value when you have a permanent in play that is passively winning you the game. Fungal Rebirth is also the only way to bring the card back from the graveyard in the set, and also has the upside of creating a couple of chump blockers to buy you more time to mill your opponent out. Also don't forget about Epitaph Golem it can be a very potent sideboard card against you in BO3, and if you've seen it you might want to keep a removal spell or counterspell handy for it if your deck might struggle to close out the game in other ways than milling.

These decks can be any color combination though I tend to think the Blue-White version is the weakest and the Blue-Green and Blue-Black versions the strongest. 

White provides very little in the way of card draw and because most of the cards skew aggressive you aren't getting that much out of them. This is likely the best deck for Swift Response in the format though as there will be a lot of tapped creatures trying to get at you.

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The Black version of this deck is pretty interesting, and I believe the most powerful overall. It can use the loot effects well to power up Rise Again, while also providing some unique options. Obsessive Stitcher has a no cost loot attached to it which will help mill your opponent out very quickly while allowing you to use your mana on other things. It has good defensive creatures like Deathbloom Thallid that can block well and some premium removal like Grasp of Darkness. I think the most important cards here are Sanctum of Stone Fangs and Pestilent Haze. Sanctum powers up your Blue sanctum, allowing you to draw 2 cards a turn, but also the passive lifegain really adds up. Staying alive long enough can sometimes be a problem, and it can also provide an alternate win condition, or an alternate target for enchantment removal. This format is lacking in sweepers even at higher rarities and it's also crawling with X/2 creatures. This makes Pestilent Haze a potentially extremely powerful card with a potential drawback of killing your own creatures, but because you'll be prioritizing high toughness creatures this is also the deck best at negating the symmetry of the card

Green provides both Fungal Rebirth, but also a smidge of card draw itself. It also provides other threats to distract or even just beat your opponents. Lorescale Coatl can be an impossible road block for your opponent to remove, or just something that attacks them a few times and ends the game. Green's strong defense early drops also help keep you alive. Portcullis Vine does work here as both a solid blocker, but also something you can later cash in to draw a card triggering Tutelage. Vine and his buddy Wall of Runes also have some nice synergy, and they both tend to go very late and can stonewall early offense in tandem.

Red provides the thing red mostly does in this set, plentiful removal. There isn't anything specifically too fancy here, a bit of card draw is obviously nice, but I don't think this provides the unique power the Green or Black versions do. You can throw Tutelage into a baseline prowess deck and attack from a different angle however and that can be difficult for your opponent to know how they should approach the game, and your high density of card draw means you'll be able to close out a game in short time.

Top Commons

Opt [M21]
Grasp of Darkness [M21]
Llanowar Visionary [M21]
Teferi's Protege [M21]
Skyscanner [M21]

Top Uncommons

Teferi's Tutelage [M21]
Sanctum of Calm Waters [M21]
Obsessive Stitcher [M21]
Pestilent Haze [M21]
Waker of Waves [M21]

Top Rares/Mythics

Sublime Epiphany [M21]
Teferi, Master of Time [M21]
Chandra, Heart of Fire [M21]
Ugin, the Spirit Dragon [M21]
Teferi's Ageless Insight [M21]

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Black-White Lifegain

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I've been trying to make this work, and I just can't. I had a deck with five Revitalize and three Griffin Aerie when I tried to force the archetype and it just felt okay. Sometimes by the time I made a single Griffin even after playing Aerie on turn 2 my opponent had three creatures in play. The ask of gaining 3 life in a single turn is so much, and there are few on color cards that can do it in one go, and the ones that do don't contribute to your board state for the most part. This makes the best way to trigger these effects attacking with lifelink creatures, but black is an inherently defensive color with few aggressive elements. Having to play somewhat nonaggressive cards in your aggressive deck means you'll have problems properly curving out and maintaining board presence, this is further worsened by needing to tap Tavern Swindler on your own turn. It's a lot of hoops to jump through to get effects that don't feel any more powerful than what other colors are doing. Or ones that are just absurdly weak and awful like Light of Promise. You're not generally defensive enough to protect yourself other than with your raw life total, and you don't get enough value. A Red-Green deck will be drawing a bunch of cards with Furious Rise simply for having a creature they already want in play, and you'll feel stupid for Tavern Swindler flipping coins during your main phase. The best feeling of the decks I tried was actually just a weird grindy Abzan deck using Silversmote Ghoul and Twinblade Assassins to bury my opponents through card advantage. Cards like Faith's Fetters are extremely powerful, but every white deck wants it as a premium removal spell, so you'll rarely get it. An archetype can end up feeling weak when its best cards are desired by every on color drafter and it's more niche cards are just begrudging playables. Previous versions of this archetype had much easier to trigger conditions and more cards that just felt like good cards, and I feel like that it just doesn't get there.

This is the one archetype I'd suggest you avoid at the moment. I do think there is possibly a way to backdoor into a white aggressive deck that is mostly using black for a few of the decently aggressive creatures and Malefic Scythe with a few lifelink creatures. I'd assume that would be much more powerful than any sort of dedicated lifegain deck. 

Top Commons

Grasp of Darkness [M21]
Basri's Acolyte [M21]
Anointed Chorister [M21]
Revitalize [M21]
Finishing Blow [M21]

Top Uncommons

Faith's Fetters [M21]
Seasoned Hallowblade [M21]
Indulging Patrician [M21]
Sanctum of Stone Fangs [M21]
Aven Gagglemaster [M21]

Top Rares/Mythics

Baneslayer Angel [M21]
Vito, Thorn of the Dusk Rose [M21]
Mazemind Tome [M21]
Mangara, the Diplomat [M21]
Hooded Blightfang [M21]

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Top Overall Cards

Top Commons

Scorching Dragonfire [M21]
Roaming Ghostlight [M21]
Basri's Acolyte [M21]
Grasp of Darkness [M21]
Drowsing Tyrannodon [M21]

Top Uncommons

Seasoned Hallowblade [M21]
Teferi's Tutelage [M21]
Conclave Mentor [M21]
Faith's Fetters [M21]
Soul Sear [M21]

Top Rares/Mythics

Sublime Epiphany [M21]
Terror of the Peaks [M21]
Elder Gargaroth [M21]
Ugin, the Spirit Dragon [M21]
Massacre Wurm [M21]

Finishing Up

I've learned a lot over the first week of M21 draft, and I'm pretty interested to see where it will go. I think 9/10 color combinations are really sweet and have a lot going on with them, and I hope I can touch on them more in the future. This format has a lot of things to teach about combat math, and understanding the importance of aggressive heuristics which is a nice change of pace. I think a lot can be learned by playing this format by players who aren't used to playing aggressive decks. When you get used to playing aggressive decks in limited the range of what you can draft and will draft opens up. Not only do you become a potentially better drafter, you learn more about how both you and your opponent should be thinking about in the role of the aggressor, which is an overall levelup. Anyways, take two-drop, play two-drop, don't be afraid to turn some dogs sideways.


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